Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

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Alexa
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Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby Alexa » Tue Apr 25, 2017 10:53 am

I've always hoped somebody will ask Bashar about Jorge Luis Borges - where did his writings come from, who was he in touch with, whether his writings were channeled and whether or not he is back again into somebody we could identify.

He was a genius Argentinian writer (died in 1986), his erudition surpassing almost all I could fathom, extremely interested in the fantastical and the eerie, in the power of language and the infinite and how the infinite offers us glimpses into itself. I've read most of his short stories and essays when I was very young and not very knowledgeable, not being able to understand the vast majority of his meanings, and still was haunted by his visions and interpretations of life and understanding.

I've recently started to re-read him and I've realized that now - with the filter of Bashar's teachings over my eyes - I see glimpses of that in almost all his stories, almost as if he was connected to a huge vault of esoteric knowledge regarding parallel universes and infinity.

For the very few who will have the patience and the insight to read the following text, please feel free to share any opinions on it. For those who are curious and only wish to skim the surface, there's the first paragraph of his five pages text "The Library of Babel", written in 1941.


The universe (which others call the Library) is composed of an indefinite and perhaps infinite
number of hexagonal galleries, with vast air shafts between, surrounded by very low railings.
From any of the hexagons one can see, interminably, the upper and lower floors. The
distribution of the galleries is invariable. Twenty shelves, five long shelves per side, cover all
the sides except two; their height, which is the distance from floor to ceiling, scarcely exceeds
that of a normal bookcase. One of the free sides leads to a narrow hallway which opens onto
another gallery, identical to the first and to all the rest. To the left and right of the hallway
there are two very small closets. In the first, one may sleep standing up; in the other, satisfy
one's fecal necessities. Also through here passes a spiral stairway, which sinks abysmally and
soars upwards to remote distances. In the hallway there is a mirror which faithfully duplicates
all appearances. Men usually infer from this mirror that the Library is not infinite (if it were,
why this illusory duplication?); I prefer to dream that its polished surfaces represent and
promise the infinite ... Light is provided by some spherical fruit which bear the name of
lamps. There are two, transversally placed, in each hexagon. The light they emit is
insufficient, incessant.

And the English translation of the entire text:
http://www.arts.ucsb.edu/faculty/reese/ ... 0Babel.pdf

ingerul9
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby ingerul9 » Tue Apr 25, 2017 1:59 pm

Thank you for sharing this author. I have only heard of his tale named - The Garden of Forking Paths but never read it. On the same line you can see the works of Philip K. Dick - as I am fascinated with his insights as you are with Borges.

Consider this -> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXeVgEs4sOo - Did Philip K. Dick disclose the real Matrix in 1977?
His speech in the video is entitled - "If You Find This World Bad, You Should See Some of the Others" and can be found here - https://ia600500.us.archive.org/32/items/PhilipKDickSpeechExcerpts/PhilipKDick_Speech.txt

Some excerpts:

What if -- and here you will see how at least this particular SF writer gets his plots -- what if there exists a plurality of universes arranged along a sort of lateral axis, which is to say at right angles to the flow of linear time? I must admit that upon thinking this I found I had conjured up a terrific absurdity: ten thousand bodies of God arranged like so many suits hanging in some enormous closet, with God either wearing them all at once or going selectively back and forth among them, saying to himself, "I think today I'll wear the one in which Germany and Japan won World War II" and then adding, half to himself, "And tomorrow I'll wear that nice one in which Napoleon defeated the British; that's one of my best.


Well, let us consider a favorite topic of Christian thinkers: the topic of eternity. This concept, historically speaking, was one great new idea brought by Christianity to the world. We are pretty sure that eternity exists -- that the word "eternity" refers to something actual, in contrast, say, to the word "angels." Eternity is simply a state in which you are free from and somehow out of and above time. There is no past, present, and future; there is just pure ontological being. "Eternity" is not a word denoting merely a very long time; it is essentially timeless. Well, let me ask this: Are there any changes that take place there; i.e., take place outside of time? Because if you say, "Yes, eternity is not static; things happen," then I at once smile knowingly and point out that you have introduced time once more. The concept "time" simply denotes -- or rather posits -- a condition or state or stream -- whatever -- in which change occurs. No time, no change. Eternity is static. But if it is static, it is even less than long-enduring; it is more like a geometric point, an infinitude of which can be determined along any given line. Viewing my theory about orthogonal or lateral change, I defend myself by saying, "At least it is intellectually less nonsensical than the concept of eternity." And everyone talks about eternity, whether they intend to do anything about it or not.

Let me present you with a metaphor. Let us say that there exists this very rich patron of the arts. Every day on the wall of his living room above his fireplace his servants hang a new picture -- each day a different masterpiece, day after day, month after month -- each day the "used" one is removed and replaced by a different and new one. I will call this process change along the linear axis. But now let us suppose the servants temporarily running out of new, replacement pictures. What shall they do in the meantime? They can't just leave the present one hanging; their employer has decreed that perpetual replacement -- i.e. changing the pictures -- is to take place. So they neither allow the current one to remain nor do they replace it with a new one; instead, they do a very clever thing. When their employer is not looking, the servants cunningly alter the picture already on the wall. They paint out a tree here; they paint in a little girl there; they add this; they obliterate that; they make the same painting different and in a sense new, but as I'm sure you can see, not new in the sense of replacing it. The employer enters his living room after dinner, seats himself facing his fireplace, and contemplates what should be -- according to his expectations -- a new picture. What does he see? It certainly isn't what he saw previously. But also it is somehow. . . and here we must become very sympathetic with this perhaps somewhat stupid man, because we can virtually see his brain circuits striving to understand. His brain circuits are saying, "Yes, it is a new picture, it is not the same one as yesterday, but also it is the same one, I think, I feel on a very deep, intuitive basis. . . I feel that somehow I've seen it before. I seem to remember a tree, though, and there is no tree." Now, perhaps, if we extrapolate from this man's perceptual, mentational confusion to the theoretical point I was making about lateral change, you can get a better idea of what I mean; I mean, perhaps you can, to at least a degree, see that although what I'm talking about may not exist -- my concept may be fictional -- it could exist. It is not intellectually self-contradictory.


A book was published a couple of years back - https://www.amazon.com/Exegesis-Philip-K-Dick/dp/0547549253/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1493125654&sr=8-1&keywords=exegesis - The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick

In there it is collected a short summary (1000 pages out of 9000) :) of his own ideas about what happened to him in 2-3-74. He published his experiences in a fictional autobiography - https://www.amazon.com/VALIS-Valis-Trilogy-Philip-Dick/dp/0547572417/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1493125775&sr=1-1&keywords=valis - VALIS - Vast Active Living Intelligence System and subsequent volumes - Divine Invasions and The Transmigration of Timothy Archer.

A short summary in comic form can be found in - http://www.philipkdickfans.com/resources/miscellaneous/the-religious-experience-of-philip-k-dick-by-r-crumb-from-weirdo-17/

From my own understanding based on reading his experience - it seems he experienced a parallel life in the Christian era - he was in a sect and was being persecuted by the romans - the year was 74 AD as identified by him.

http://zebrapedia.psu.edu - this site contains the unpublished parts of Exegesis

Bahar
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby Bahar » Tue Apr 25, 2017 9:47 pm

Very interesting post. Abraham and bashar have said once you are on the proper frequency you can have access to information from other sources. Past , present, future, parallel universes, etc..
I used to enjoy reading borges very much as well when I was younger but somehow I don't remember much of what I have read. I mostly remember the mysterious and complex emotions I experienced while reading his books. Haruki murakami's writings are very enjoyable for me as well. He seems to be in a magical flow when he writes. A quality that is hard to describe.
I don't think that what borges wrote about necessarily has historic accuracy though but that it hints to certain states of being that we have forgotten about.

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Alice
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby Alice » Tue Apr 25, 2017 11:12 pm

Thanks Alexa, I printed out the story and will peruse. It seems a bit too complex to read online.

But from my first look-over I felt that Borges would have an affinity for the works of Lewis Carroll. I wasn't wrong, found:
https://juandahlmann.wordpress.com/2010 ... s-carroll/

This part, from a translation of a preface Borges wrote to Carroll's works, seems like it could have been an inspiration for "The Library of
Babel":
In the second chapter of his book Symbolic Logic (1892), C.L Dodgson, whose everlasting name is Lewis Carroll, wrote that the universe consists of things which can be ordered by classes and that one of these is the class of the impossible. He gave as an example the class of things which weigh more than a ton and that a boy is able to levitate. If they don’t exist, if they were not part of our happiness, we would say that the books of Alice correspond to this category. In effect, how to conceive a work that is not less delightful and inviting than The Arabian Nights and that is likewise a plot of paradoxes of logical and metaphysical order? Alice dreams of the Red King, who is dreaming of her, and someone warns her that if the King awakens, she will go out like a candle, because she is no more than a dream of the King that she is dreaming. In regard to this reciprocal dream that well could have no end, Martin Gardner recalls a certain fat woman, who painted a thin female painter, who painted a fat female painter that painted a thin female painter, and so on to infinity.


Look forward to reading the story. ingerul9, Philip K. Dick is another one I'd like to explore further, thanks for the links and quotes.

Alexa
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby Alexa » Wed Apr 26, 2017 8:29 am

Ingerul9: thank you for the hint, Philip K. Dick is definitely going on my future readings list! (Should I say multumesc??;)

Bahar: you're absolutely right about forgetting most of it and retaining only the feelings, his texts are insanely dense with complex concepts about infinity, time, logic, duality etc. The point for me was not about a possible historical rendition, but of a strange world of information about the real structure of the world, one most people not only have no access to, but also have difficulty to grasp when explained. His texts are overwhelmingly written in prose, but his poetry oozes through all of them, and when combined with abstract philosophy, anything can happen (including forgetting all the info and retaining only the feeling:). Murakami has also been on my list for a while, but didn't actually happen yet, now I'll make it happen;).

Mirrors (and duality) are a recurring theme for Borges as well, which brings me to

Alice: you're spot on, he was one of the best read people in the world, and one of his favorites was Lewis Caroll. Another was Poe, btw, and he also enjoyed the Nordic sagas, the Arabian nights and even UNWRITTEN literature, which he made a point out of commenting about. One of the strangest things (for me) he was doing was writing complex commentaries about books that have never been written, he has a lot of these, as if he was the only person in the world that had access to a secret library that exists in another dimension. By Bashar logic, all those writings exists somewhere, and our only glimpse of them are JLB's commentaries.

Thank you all, you've made my day! And if you keep reading him and feel you have something to say about it, feel free to comment in the future, I've nobody else to talk to about him:))) It felt proper to bring it up here on the forum because lately I've been rethinking his concepts through Bashar's teachings.

ingerul9
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby ingerul9 » Wed Apr 26, 2017 12:53 pm

Alexa wrote:Ingerul9: thank you for the hint, Philip K. Dick is definitely going on my future readings list! (Should I say multumesc??;)


Yes. I'm from Romania. You're welcome.

Alexa
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby Alexa » Wed Apr 26, 2017 1:12 pm

ingerul9 wrote:
Alexa wrote:Ingerul9: thank you for the hint, Philip K. Dick is definitely going on my future readings list! (Should I say multumesc??;)


Yes. I'm from Romania. You're welcome.


Great! Daca vezi vreodata pe strada una cu circuitele siriene pe ea, eu sunt:)))))))

ingerul9
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby ingerul9 » Wed Apr 26, 2017 1:44 pm

Alexa wrote:
ingerul9 wrote:
Alexa wrote:Ingerul9: thank you for the hint, Philip K. Dick is definitely going on my future readings list! (Should I say multumesc??;)


Yes. I'm from Romania. You're welcome.


Great! Daca vezi vreodata pe strada una cu circuitele siriene pe ea, eu sunt:)))))))


You made me chuckle. For some odd reason I imagined when I read your statement someone who has antenna's in her heads - like the ET conference meetings in the 90s :))))))))).

I wasn't aware the sacred symbols given by Bashar were Sirian in origin if that's what you're referring to. I suggest to keep the main thread in english for other readers to understand as well. If you want to communicate in romanian send me a private message.

Alexa
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby Alexa » Wed Apr 26, 2017 2:06 pm

ingerul9 wrote:
Alexa wrote:
ingerul9 wrote:
Yes. I'm from Romania. You're welcome.


Great! Daca vezi vreodata pe strada una cu circuitele siriene pe ea, eu sunt:)))))))


You made me chuckle. For some odd reason I imagined when I read your statement someone who has antenna's in her heads - like the ET conference meetings in the 90s :))))))))).

I wasn't aware the sacred symbols given by Bashar were Sirian in origin if that's what you're referring to. I suggest to keep the main thread in english for other readers to understand as well. If you want to communicate in romanian send me a private message.


No need for pm in Romanian, just wanted to have a little harmless bilingual fun.

Yeah, they're from Sirius, and I've always wondered whether I'll ever meet someone on the street who knows what my tattoo means. Now I know it could happen. Some Borgesian stuff, hahaha!

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Alice
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby Alice » Fri Apr 28, 2017 7:42 am

OK, I read it...still reeling :shock:

I did some sleuthing online and it seems there are supposed to be footnotes. I think I'd like to read an illustrated copy, with the
footnotes. This one looks good: https://www.amazon.com/Library-Babel-Jo ... 156792123X

Some of the etchings can be seen here:
http://www.johncoulthart.com/feuilleton ... smazieres/

Anyway, Borges is definitely up my alley, I like surreal and eerie. btw, did you know the Pleiadians channeled by Marciniak, call Earth
a Living Library and said their ancestors messed with our DNA to keep us from our true power. Reading Borges, I was reminded of that.

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/pleya ... %20Numbers

We have suggested that approximately half-a-million years ago tumultuous events took place in this area of existence that affects your present-day Earth. To a large degree, Earth lost her sovereignty, and another force of rulership came in and claimed ownership to this prime hunk of real estate that you call home.

These recently appointed godlike administrators have not always been the kindest and most benevolent sorts. Earth was established billions of years ago for a purpose. She was to be an intergalactic exchange center of information, part of a vast library system where data from many. Many galaxies was stored-a Living Library, to be precise.

The creator gods, those who believed themselves to be the forces of creation, came together, pooled their knowledge, and created forms of life. They borrowed DNA and combinations of genetic material from many different worlds. They stored this material in Earth's library system, which was connected to a system of twelve cosmic libraries. You can see that the plan for Earth was a grand one.

The Original Planners of Earth were members of the Family of Light, beings who worked for and were associated with an aspect of consciousness called light. Light is information. Members of the Family of Light created the information and would be able to participate and share their specific knowledge.

The project of the Living Library on Earth was eventually fought over. Skirmishes took place, and Earth became a place of conflict and duality.

Certain creator gods who had the right to do whatever they wanted - because Earth is a free-will zone - came in and took over. These creator gods raided Earth approximately half-a-million years ago - the time period, historically speaking, that you would call the beginning of the latest phase of civilization, the phase of modern humanity. Variations of human life have existed for millions of years.

When these skirmishes occurred, a certain group of entities fought in space and won the territory of Earth. These new owners wanted the native Earth species to remain un-evolved and uninformed so that the species would be easier to control. The original species of human creation experienced great destruction, and its DNA was scattered.

What the gods now realize is that we are in a dilemma in the Pleiades. There is a tyranny that was let loose on Earth, and that Tyranny has returned to us. Did you know that we made that tyranny, that we stripped you of your heritage of a fully functioning, twelve stranded DNA? Do not be naïve about Pleiadeans, including us. Why do you think we are doing this healing work on your planet? Consider that perhaps we need you for our next phase of development. If we wish to grow, we must heal a past that we have been connected to.

In our search for why we are in such a big mess in the Pleiades, we were led into the future to show us that our system will go nowhere without you. In other words, we cannot evolve further as creators until we give all our abilities and all our rights to everything we have created.

We cannot police and control what we create. This is our dilemma. This is why we wait for you to discover your own experience as a creator. When you do, you will give off a code of formulas. Perhaps even if you become very highly evolved, you will never understand the formulas- not for a long, long time.

Others may access the formulas from you, and in exchange you will experience states of ecstasy, alterations of consciousness, or perhaps trips into other worlds. You may not realize you are emitting the formulas when you do this.

Others who need the formulas will use them to replicate lives, or to reestablish systems that are being destroyed. When those codes of information or formulas are set out in existence, we will be free because the codes of consciousness contain the songs of your own freedom, sung as frequency and broadcast from the cells of your body.

ingerul9
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby ingerul9 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 10:25 am

I have just read "The Library of Babel" and I'll post some of the ideas that I got from this book and then take them further by analysis with summary of my understanding of Bashar and Dan Winter.

So in the Library there is mentioned in the annotated notes
The original manuscript does not contain digits or capital letters. The punctuation has been limited to the comma and the period. These two signs, the space and the twenty-two letters of the alphabet are the twenty-five sufficient symbols enumerated by this unknown author.


This made me think about the twenty two letters of the Jewish alphabet - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_alphabet#Alphabet which is connected to Sefer Yetzirah - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sefer_Yetzirah#Structure. Kabbalah and Tarot make extensively use of these 22 paths or cards - representing the archetypes of the human experience.

How is this connected to Bashar? Well in the "Tesseract Workshop" Bashar mentioned that if you take a tetrahedral structure and in the middle of it you put up a spiral - and then you move the tetrahedron in certain ways you can describe the letters of the alphabet. Low and behold Dan Winter at the same time was taking his cue from Stanley Tenen of how to improve his original idea of "empowering letters". Dan Winter along with his team created a simulation based on the tetrahedron with the golden spiral in the center of it (his addition to this idea of Tenen) and showed the 22 letters of Hebrew Alphabet - here it is the animation -> http://www.goldenmean.info/dnaring/spinner/index.html. Some would say that this is forced but I like it.

Based on the tetrahedron structure you can create all of the other structures that comprise the chemical elements for life - the cube, octahedron, the dodecahedron and the icosahedron -> http://21stcenturysciencetech.com/Articles%202004/Spring2004/Periodicity.pdf

Also of particular note is Occult Chemistry by Annie Besant and Charles W. Leadbeater - 2 clairvoyants from the Theosopical Society who have "remote viewed" the atomic elements of the periodic table - it was published according to wikipedia in 1908 long before we had the tools to analyze them properly, at least in my own understanding - http://www.anandgholap.net/AB_CWL_Occult_Chemistry.htm and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occult_Chemistry.

Dan Winter shows how the spiral - and in particular the golden mean and fractality or infinite regression/implosion based on the Platonic solids yields the life we see today. It took me a while to see the connections that he makes on his troublesome (because of the way he writes the articles) site but once you understand it, it becomes truly magical and wondrous.

Taking further the idea of Jorge Luis Borges in the book I'm once again reminded of Indra's net - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indra's_net a concept that Bashar also mentioned, in that the early understanding of Holography that we know today was available in earlier history through metaphor.

The concept of the fractal is not mentioned in the works of Jorge Luis Borges (correct me if I'm wrong Alice) or Philip K. Dick but if you read their works you can truly see this is what "they saw" when they talked of the concepts covered in their books - infinity and fractals - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractal. It is truly amazing how the imagination can take you so further if you just trust your visions.

This was also known as "As Above so Below " in Hermeticism - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermeticism. It can also be seen in the first card of the tarot called the magician - he has one hand pointed upwards and one hand pointed downwards, and with the symbol of infinity above his head - Image - meaning in my interpretation that the human is divine and terrestrial as well with feet firmly planted in the Earth but with the wisdom of the Heavens as well so as to make a perfect balance - the Yin and the Yang - spoiler alert for those who have not seen Shaolin Soccer look at your own peril to the finale but it sums up in a nice package the teachings - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbL9lkN2HFA- If you want to be enlightened, Lighten Up and laugh.

Alexa
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby Alexa » Fri Apr 28, 2017 2:39 pm

Alice and ingerul9, my head is spinning! I'm so glad I've brought this up here, like you wouldn't believe!!!

Alice: I've never seen the Pleiadian info you've posted, I had a different idea about them up until now, but it seems to make sense from what I've read so far, and will continue to dig deeper into it. I already had some questions about the different forms of life on Earth (ex: how little sens it made to me to have the same "model" of an animal (like a rat ) with two totally different reproductive systems, like mammals and marsupials) for which I was not totally content with the official explanations, but this library thing can definitely shed some light into that. If you enjoyed The Library, you shaould definitely try the entire volume of short stories "The Aleph", particularly the Aleph itself and also the Zahir, which brings me to

ingerul9: you've hit the nail on the head with the Jewish alphabet, his writings are full of hermetical ideas and the aleph (the first letter of the alphabet) is a perfect example of where he took some of his themes from (and, of course, alchemy, which is also pivotal for his writings about transmutation). The thing called "aleph" in the story is actually this (wiki quote): "a point in space that contains all other points. Anyone who gazes into it can see everything in the universe from every angle simultaneously, without distortion, overlapping, or confusion. The story traces the theme of infinity found in several of Borges' other works, such as "The Book of Sand"."

He didn't actually referred to fractals, as Mandelbrot only named them as such in 1975 if I'm not mistaken, but all throughout his works he delves into the infinite and repetitive nature of time and space, waxing poetic about it and putting things into a more narrative rather than purely philosophical form.

I had no idea the Theosophers had done that, it's (wanted to write "unbelievable" but, hey, we're on the Bashar forum, there's no such thing!:)) amazing and beautiful!

Indra's net is the way I actually envisioned the library itself, like a more intellectualized version of it, at least. It's the infinity model that he goes back to over and over again, sometimes using the idea of mirrors as instruments of infinite copying, sometimes using references to time. The vagueness of life as opposed to dreams and the fluidity of existence, the repetitive spirals of time, they're all there as well.

The Zahir is a sort of opposite of the Aleph, as while the Aleph gives you access to the ALL THAT IS, the Zahir makes you obsessed with a singularity, whatever that singularity may be. The all and the one are just different ways of seeing reality, but just as compelling.

Gotta go now, but will be back with more!

chgle2886
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby chgle2886 » Tue May 02, 2017 6:01 am

Thanks for the information guys.. .

ialmostforgot
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby ialmostforgot » Thu May 11, 2017 7:18 pm

I was struck by Borges when I was very young. Being Spanish-speaker, it's a must. The first story I was fascinated by was the one titled "The Inmortal". As for your question regarding the channeling in Borges' writing, I guess Bashar would say that of course he was a medium, as anybody is, only some people are much more focused in their respective fields/passions and so on.

He really streched the concepts of time, space, human consciousness, etc. He was bold and very much to the point: every word, every sentence, is very well thought.

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Alice
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Re: Something for the very few - Jorge Luis Borges

Postby Alice » Tue May 30, 2017 4:24 am

I looked up some biographical info on him and learned: "In 1938, he suffered a severe head wound. In the next eight years he produced his best fantastic stories."

Interesting! I've heard that concussion is associated with spiritual development/empathic qualities.
https://www.elephantjournal.com/2015/07 ... in-common/

Yeah...I had one. Fell and banged head on the ice while ice skating.


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