Don't Follow Your Passion

A place to talk about Bashar's teachings and anything you feel is relevant to it.

Moderators: Rokazulu, xplosiw, Alice

Post Reply
dunloff
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 12:02 pm

Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by dunloff » Fri Jun 10, 2016 5:14 pm

What do you think about this?

[youtube]CVEuPmVAb8o[/youtube]

I strongly disagree and let's talk about what would be the answer from Bashar to this video. :!:

User avatar
Rokazulu
Posts: 501
Joined: Mon May 23, 2016 7:57 pm
Contact:

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by Rokazulu » Sat Jun 11, 2016 1:26 am

Yeah, his viewpoint is interesting I guess.

He says that the septic cleaner said that he became passionate about his job after he made multi-millions.

Of course, job security and all, most people probably mistake money for happiness. I have no doubt that all the men Mike comes across are very successful in terms of a decent living. But, do they enjoy their job? Completely possible, but we would have to ask them. (Has anyone watched Dirty Jobs at all? Does he ever ask them this question?)

Now when he was talking about American Idol contestants he said they expected to land that huge career opportunity. So of course they will be let down. You never need to expect anything when following your passion, this is an Essassani concept and a Taoist one as well.

I think his idea of passion is perhaps narrow and I don't believe it contradicts with the idea of opportunity. It is all about having no expectations on your "dream job".
Rokazulu and the Mystical Eschaton
(The sharing of experiences)

User avatar
SiriusHigherMind
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Oct 17, 2015 7:07 pm

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by SiriusHigherMind » Sat Jun 11, 2016 8:57 am

I think that during the video there were some flawed premises about how everything works and what everything is.

If you come from a mindset/beliefsystem that is more rooted in biology, a seperate reality, reason, economy etc. this makes a lot of sense.
If you take in account how reality works, a deep honesty with yourself, unconditional love etc. than this will feel off.

User avatar
AlwaysBeNice
-
Posts: 1417
Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2015 10:22 am

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by AlwaysBeNice » Sat Jun 11, 2016 6:47 pm

The 'work or die' mindset is just severely broken, as it takes just a fraction of a workweek to supply the basics yet we expect people to work because we want everyone to value luxury over freedom.

But to fastest way to create a new working system is to stop supporting this one.
Best evidence for UFOs: http://www.bestUFOevidence.com
Evidence for the soul http://www.evidenceforthesoul.com
The experiences that verified Bashar for me: bashar-forum.org/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7

User avatar
Luc
Posts: 66
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2015 8:06 am

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by Luc » Sun Jun 12, 2016 11:11 am

What this guy is saying is: you have your dreams, you have your passions and desires... and then there's the outside reality. Just like what all religions are preaching: there are people and then there's God, nicely separated from each other. What he doesn't seem to realize is that this outside reality is entirely created by ourselves. Reality cannot be separated from the one who is experiencing it, it is not a thing on its own. We create our reality, isn't that what Seth, Bashar and all others have been constantly teaching us? So if this path of discovering passion in an indirect way has worked for this guy, than that's fine. It doesn't mean that it has to work that way for everybody.

kadnium
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2016 2:00 am

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by kadnium » Fri Jun 17, 2016 3:44 pm

A few things come to mind that Bashar has taught that I think is pertinent:
  1. at any moment observe to see what is your highest excitement that you can act on, follow this until you can take it no further with zero expectation of the outcome, repeat
  2. if you harbour a belief system that no longer serves and you are not willing to let go of it, it does you no good to ignore it. You must honour it. Bashar has illustrated this in two ways:
    • don't jump off a cliff if you don't have a parachute
    • don't jump off a cliff if you don't believe you have wings
  3. your experiential life's "theme" (or "story arc") was determined pre-incarnation. It is like a hallway that you have set for yourself to travel through. How you choose to travel it is up to you (the free will aspect). This theme sets (the destiny aspect) what experiences you will experience that are most probably.
  4. all experiences are possible but not all have the same probability ... some experiences are just not relevant to your theme or agreements you've made pre-incarnation.
  5. your physical being isn't all that you are; there's also your higher self (and other levels of consciousness)
If we use the singing competition example mentioned in the video ... by the definition of singing competitions, it means that there will only be few "winners". The difficulty comes when a person has the passion:
  • but has expectations of what that passion will bring them and in doing so has bought into a belief system that ultimately will disappoint them. Certainly, if it is not relevant to their life agreements then the probability of "winning" will be slim. It could be the case that the passion was there only to give them the experience of participating in a competition. That experience may give them an edge up on a later life situation. I am reminded of Steve Jobs being interested in a calligraphy course in college; he took that class not knowing of any practical value at the time. It wasn't until 10 years later on that he would make use of that skill set and insisting it be part of the Macintosh OS. At the time he took the course he followed his passion with zero expectation only to later on use it much later in life: only in hindsight could he connect the dots.
    https://youtu.be/UF8uR6Z6KLc?t=203

    OR
  • but does not have the skill set/talent and hasn't examined if they can really act on this passion. Maybe they do have the talent but harbour beliefs that works against their passion. They did not honour what their ego is still latched onto.
The advice in the video is based on an economy of scarcity/limitation and a belief system that a proper life entails tending towards a job that pays "well" (the opportunity to prosper). SO the advice is good advice if you have these beliefs and that these beliefs are always true for you. Perhaps a person's life agreements assume this to be relevant and constant; in such an arrangement that advice is good. But is this the case for the majority of people?

Bashar has said that passion and imagination is how your higher self (which is YOU also) communicates to your physical being. If you ignore this then you are literally operating as a partial being. You won't be able to fulfill your life agreements with ease. In such circumstances, the best the physical being can do is apply logic and I think that is what is being offered in this video. In the zen tradition there is the idea of a "transmission beyond words" (beyond logic) ... in one zen tradition they call it "transcendental reasoning". I've liken this to a reasoning that comes from the higher mind. Because the higher mind communicates in passion and imagination it won't make logical sense. But the two (higher mind and the ego) need to work as a team.

Much of what Bashar teaches resonates with me; if I were to follow the advice of this video, I would be operating as a partial being.

It is the case that we live in an economy of scarcity (if you are reading this then you live in the same universe as me) but this is just the consensual reality that is the back drop of which I will play out my life agreements. Does that mean I need to change how our world (economy) works? Perhaps yes, perhaps no. My life agreements may deem how the world works kinda crappy but it is perhaps irrelevant for me to change it.

tmh
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2016 9:28 am

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by tmh » Wed Jun 29, 2016 9:33 am

Always act on your highest excitement at every moment that you can; to the best of your ability, taking it as far as you can; until you can take it no further and then act on the next highest excitement; with absolutely ZERO insistence or assumption on the outcome or how thing should look or where you suppose to go.

User avatar
Alice
Posts: 2112
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:30 pm

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by Alice » Wed Jun 29, 2016 8:05 pm

I was just reading this and it struck me that it fits here. The writer Henry Miller left a secure job
and his family, to follow his passions in Paris.

excerpts from:
http://www.bflowriter.com/dix14henrymiller.html
This guy Miller interests me. For a 43 year old
bum who has written one book no one has read
he seems amazingly well known. He is short,
bald and likes to smoke. He has a cigarette
dangling from his chops at all times.

I like Miller. He lives by his wits. He is a
hustler. But he is an entertaining hustler. He
has charisma. This is unusual in a writer.

...

I go for a walk with Miller. This is what he does.
He walks. He walks, walks, walks. He knows
Paris inside out. He knows the city better than
people who have lived here their entire life.

We walk and he points out the sights. This is
the house where Balzac lived. This is the bridge
Courbet considered jumping from when
threatened with jail by his creditors. This is
the alley where Edgar Allen Poe was assaulted
while drunk.

There is something about this man. He is free.
He has nothing but he is happy. He doesnt give
a piss. The word future is not in his vocabulary.
He prefers to concentrate on what is occurring
in his life at that moment. I am told this is a
Zen Buddhist concept. It is also the concept of
a child.

Also: there is no malice here. He doesnt have a
mean bone in his body.
...

He says: This is my philosophy. It came to me
when I was 33. I was working for the telephone
company in New York. I was in charge of the
personnel dept. I hired and fired. I had a big
office with a secretary. It wasnt a bad job. It
was a great job. There was pussy, pussy,
pussy. The woman came at me like flies.

I met all these people. I met the young and the
old and the funny and the sad and the sane and
the insane and the good, the bad and the ugly.
They would come in and sit down and tell me
their stories. I heard amazing stories.

One day I was sitting in my office looking out
the window. The thought occurred to me that
my life was over. I was trapped like a rat. I had
this job that I would continue to work at for the
next 40 years and then I would drop dead.

I continued to dwell on this thought and then I
got up from my chair and went in to see my
boss and told him I was quitting.

I was married at the time and had a child. I
went home and my wife said: what are you
doing here? I told her. There followed a long
conversation. But I had made up my mind.

Thats how I became a writer. I dont know if I
quit my job first and then decided to be a writer
or vice versa. But the minute I thought of it it
was something that seemed to make perfect
sense.

Later I met a woman who was as crazy as I
was. We came to Paris together. Then she
went back to NY. Then she came back to
Paris. Then back to NY. But I stayed. And here
I am.

User avatar
Alice
Posts: 2112
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:30 pm

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by Alice » Mon Jul 04, 2016 8:37 pm

I was just reading this and it struck me that this perfectly describes "follow your excitement." Prose poem by Charles Baudelaire:

INTOXICATION.

One must be for ever drunken: that is the sole question of importance. If you would not feel the horrible burden of Time that bruises your shoulders and bends you to the earth, you must be drunken without cease. But how? With wine, with poetry, with virtue, with what you please. But be drunken. And if sometimes, on the steps of a palace, on the green grass by a moat, or in the dull loneliness of your chamber, you should waken up, your intoxication already lessened or gone, ask of the wind, of the wave, of the star, of the bird, of the timepiece; ask of all that flees, all that sighs, all that revolves, all that sings, all that speaks, ask of these the hour; and wind and wave and star and bird and timepiece will answer you: "It is the hour to be drunken! Lest you be the martyred slaves of Time, intoxicate yourselves, be drunken without cease! With wine, with poetry, with virtue, or with what you will."

:idea: 8-)

Pair A Docs
Posts: 56
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2016 10:55 pm

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by Pair A Docs » Tue Jul 05, 2016 12:54 am

Love it, Alice. Continuity in bliss vibrations, baby.

I recall an article titled, Stages of Samadhi.

A wise man once told me, do not stop at bliss! Keep going.

Alan Watts speaks of ecstacy as being defined as, outside of oneself. Interesting! I have nearly "fallen out" during a Sufi practice of chanting in total and utter ecstacy.

Indeed. Remain thoroughly intoxicated! For me.... the less substance the better. Been working through "addiction" most of my life!

User avatar
AlwaysBeNice
-
Posts: 1417
Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2015 10:22 am

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by AlwaysBeNice » Tue Jul 05, 2016 10:03 am

Pair A Docs wrote:Love it, Alice. Continuity in bliss vibrations, baby.

I recall an article titled, Stages of Samadhi.

A wise man once told me, do not stop at bliss! Keep going.

Alan Watts speaks of ecstacy as being defined as, outside of oneself. Interesting! I have nearly "fallen out" during a Sufi practice of chanting in total and utter ecstacy.

Indeed. Remain thoroughly intoxicated! For me.... the less substance the better. Been working through "addiction" most of my life!
Cool, what practice in particular
Best evidence for UFOs: http://www.bestUFOevidence.com
Evidence for the soul http://www.evidenceforthesoul.com
The experiences that verified Bashar for me: bashar-forum.org/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7

Pair A Docs
Posts: 56
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2016 10:55 pm

Re: Don't Follow Your Passion

Post by Pair A Docs » Tue Jul 05, 2016 5:08 pm

Zhikr

Dhikr (also Zikr, Zekr, and variants; (Arabic: ذِکْر‎‎ ḏikr; plural أذكار aḏkār, meaning "remembrance") is the name of devotional acts in Islam in which short phrases or prayers are repeatedly recited silently within the mind or aloud. Rarely, it is counted on a string of beads (سلسلة صلوات)[citation needed] or a set of prayer beads (Misbaha مِسْبَحَة), comparable to the rosary of Catholic tradition. A person who recites the rosary is called a ḏākir (ذاكر). Most Sufis follow this practice of Dhikr although the word being recited varies. Tasbih (تسبيح) is a form of dhikr that involves the repetitive utterances of short sentences glorifying God. The content of the prayers includes the names of God, or a duʿāʾ (prayer of supplication) taken from the hadith or the Quran.

Post Reply